Grimoire of Cerebrus

Started in Atlantis

Category:
other
Description:

Alternate Scenario (Grimoire of Grimoires, page 57)
(Fate •••, Time •••) The mage splits across multiple time streams, coalescing into one person at the most favorable version of events.
Practice: Weaving
Action: Instant
Duration: Transitory (1 turn)
Aspect: Vulgar
Cost: 1 Mana
If the mage successfully casts the spell, he acts within a number of alternate-reality versions of the next turn equal to the spell’s Potency factor, but no more than the lowest of his Time or Fate dots. He acts at the same time during each turn in the same situation, but may perform a different action (with the player rolling the appropriate dice pools to determine its outcome, where applicable) in each alternate version. The mage can even try the same basic action in two different timelines, counting on one to provide a better result. He cannot, however, perform the same basic action in three or more realities. The mage experiences the outcome of the turn in each reality, but no other participant in the scene may change their actions except in reaction to the mage. Other participants’ dice rolls are constant for the same actions across all realities.
The mage experiences each reality simultaneously; the player must declare all his actions before resolving them. He cannot use information from one reality to influence his actions in another. Once the mage experiences all alternate turns, he chooses one. The outcome of that turn becomes the true outcome and all participants feel the effects of what happened in
that version of events — no other. Example: Blixa casts the spell using his Arcana ratings of
Time 4 and Fate 3, opting for the maximum allowed Potency of 3. He shoots at a Guardian of the Veil in two realities (the maximum number in which he is allowed to take that action), but opts to run away in his remaining alternate turn. In one reality he misses his enemy completely, but isn’t injured. In another, he hits his enemy but is shot for 4 lethal wounds. In the last, he manages to run down a flight of stairs, out of the line of fire. Blixa chooses to shoot and be shot. That reality’s
events occur during the turn. The rest never happened.
Free Council Rote: No Trap
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Fate
Blixa Dark considers this spell to be “an occult symphony of the self.” He visualizes each reality as a string on a sublime instrument, combining to create one glorious sound.

Double Shape (Space •••)
The mage merges two objects into one, so that at any given time, one object exists in the Material Realm, while the other co-exists with the object in a pocket dimension. As an instant action, the item’s owner can switch the two items, so that, for example, one’s enchanted
handgun disappears, to be replaced by its other half, an enhanced chainsaw.
Practice: Weaving
Action: Extended
Duration: Prolonged (this spell uses the advanced
prolongation factors)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: None
Aside from the convenience of carrying the two-in-one item, this spell allows both objects to benefi t equally from any further curses, defenses or enhancements subsequently woven into the combined device. Additional castings of the spell allow for additional items to be added to the mix. Only one item exists in the Material Realm; all additional forms also go to the pocket dimension when not in use. Switching an object between forms evokes Disbelief in Sleeper witnesses.
Mysterium Rote: The Right Tool
Dice Pool: Intelligence + Crafts + Space
Whether you’re exploring an ancient crypt or creeping uninvited into a secret library, carrying capacity can be a critical issue. Mysterium explorers like to keep a wide range of important tools at their disposal while still leaving room in their bags for any alluring Artifacts they may
feel the need to liberate.

Borrow From the Future (Time •••)
The mage ensorcels an item so that users can borrow successes from their future destinies and apply them to their present circumstances.
Practice: Weaving
Action: Extended
Duration: Prolonged (this spell uses the advanced
prolongation factors)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 1 Mana
For every five successes added to the target number, the user of the item can borrow one success per roll on any action to which the item contributes an equipment bonus. The Storyteller takes note of the situation, type of action and number of successes borrowed. In a subsequent scene, when the user undertakes a similar action, the same number of successes is subtracted
as dice from that roll, even if this means reducing the dice pool to a chance die. This occurs whether or not the user employs the item in that attempt. The Storyteller times this settling of temporal accounts so that the failure carries negative consequences roughly equal to what the character would have suffered in the original incident.
Example: A user borrows successes from his magic gun during a firefight with members of a drug gang. He can’t erase his debt with a mere trip to the range to pop off a few failed shots. It will instead catch up with him the next time he finds himself in life-or-death combat.
Adamantine Arrow Rote: Temporal Marker
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Time
The use of items enchanted with this spell reminds one of a popular Adamantine Arrow adage: “Kill your enemies today; let tomorrow fend for itself.” This motto is sometimes engraved on the items themselves.

Instill Homing Instinct (Space •••)
This spell enchants an item so that it returns reliably to its owner’s possession, even when the item’s present location is unknown to her. The item moves of its own volition through a gateway in space, as if by “Apportation” (see Mage: The Awakening, p. 234).
Practice: Weaving
Action: Extended
Duration: Prolonged (this spell uses the advanced
prolongation factors)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 5 Mana
The Apportation effect triggers when the item has been out of the owner’s possession for a period of time determined by the spell’s Potency. Potency Trigger Interval
1 1 month
2 1 week
3 1 day
4 12 hours
5 4 hours
Disbelief is triggered in Sleepers who witness the Apportation effect.
Adamantine Arrow Rote: Old Reliable
Dice Pool: Intelligence + Crafts + Space
To warriors of the Adamantine Arrow, the phrase “trusty sword” need not be a mere figure of speech.

Locate Source (Space ••) (Mysterium Book)
The mage can determine the precise location where an object was made or an individual was born or died. Using this spell to determine an object’s location requires Matter 1, determining where an item was enchanted requires Prime 1, determining where someone died requires Death 1 and learning where they were born requires Life 1. If Time 1 is also included, the caster will also learn precisely when this event occurred.
Practice: Unveiling
Action: Instant
Duration: Concentration
Aspect: Covert
Cost: None
The caster uses this spell and one or more maps to determine the location of the birth, death, creation or enchanting of the target. Each success allows the character to more precisely pinpoint the exact location. A single success is sufficient to pinpoint the location on a large-scale map, such as a detailed map of a continent or a large and extremely detailed world map, and provides the city, town or relatively precise section of country where this event occurred. Two successes allow the character to pin-point the location on a local map, determine the particularly neighborhood of a city or section of a town where the event occurred and provide an exact location on a street map. Three or more successes locate the event down to the exact square foot. This spell can also be used to determine where an item was destroyed or where a person or object was buried, if the mage has a connection to the object or body.
Mysterium Rote: Determine Provenance
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Space
Sometimes a single item from a large cache of important relics is found by accident, far from its source. This spell allows the mage to locate this cache, as well as allowing scholars to determine where and possibly when a particular object was made.

Precise Dating (Time •) (Mysterium Book)
The mage can determine exactly when an object or living being attained its current form. This spell reveals when an object was made, when a raw gemstone was cut or a hunk of ore was mined, when a person or animal was born or when a body or fragment of bone died. Including
Life • or Matter • reveals the date of the other major changes the person or object underwent — allowing a mage who finds a human skull to determine when the skull’s owner was born and when he died, or holding a knife, and knowing when it was made and when the ore it was made from was mined. Also, if combined with Forces •, this spell can be used to determine the last time a piece of electrically powered or electronic equipment was used or when a computer file was created or edited.

Angle Vision (Space •)
The mage can see around objects, corners or other obstructions that are blocking his view. His vision shifts as if he’d changed his vantage point to look around the blockage.
Practice: Unveiling
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: None
With Space 1, the spell can be used to direct the mage’s sight around a single corner or obstacle, as long as the new vantage point is one that’s within reach of some part of his body. He
could hold a newspaper in front of his face, for example, and see over the top of it as if he’d craned his neck. With Space 2, the mage can send his vision off like a mobile camera, around multiple, distant obstacles or through a series of twists and turns, like the bends of a ventilation shaft. The spell doesn’t magnify or illuminate whatever’s at the far end of his vision, it just provides him with an unobstructed view. This use of the spell requires the caster to concentrate for the duration of the casting.
Guardians of the Veil Rote: The Crooked Eye
Dice Pool: Wits + Investigation + Space
While this rote helps a Guardian to see what might otherwise be hidden, it’s also useful for disguising her intent. When the rote is active, no one can be certain exactly what the mage is
looking at or where she’s directing her attention. She may seem to have her head stuck in a paperback novel when she actually has a clear view of what’s happening on the other side of the book.

Intrusion Warning (Space ••)
Sometimes a mage doesn’t want to prevent something from entering or leaving a place, she just wants to know when it does. Casting this spell creates a sensitivity that will warn her in such an event.
Practice: Knowing
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 1 Mana
This spell alerts the mage who cast it whenever something passes into or out of the spell’s area of effect. Once the spell settles over an area, anything that passes through its invisible, intangible barrier during the spell’s duration alerts the mage who cast it, no matter where he is. This warning manifests as a slight tingling over the body, a pressure behind the eyes, a momentary case of synesthesia or several other minute impulses.
Successes Area Affected
1 success one-yard radius
2 successes two-yard radius
3 successes four-yard radius
4 successes eight-yard radius
5 successes 16-yard radius
Mages can, at the time of casting, narrow the spell’s definition by declaring some things exempt from notice. The exempt thing may be general (“insects and rodents” or “creatures of Size 2 or less”) or specifi c (“one-armed humanoids” or “my friend Robert”), but the spell cannot differentiate based upon anything other than normal sensory input. Choosing to exempt “my friend Robert” from the spell draws from the mage’s mental imagery to exempt anyone who appears to be Robert; the spell will not note that two people who looked like Robert passed through the barrier at the same time or delve into a person’s mind to determine that the person is
not actually Robert. Intrusion Warning does not endow the mage with any knowledge of what did pass the boundary (though he’ll know it wasn’t something he exempted), just that the spell has been breached. If the mage wishes to know anything more about the intruder, he must use additional magic, such as Space 2 “Scrying,” or mundane means. Guardians of the Veil Rote: Ensuring Solitude
Dice Pool: Composure + Investigation + Space
Guardians have many needs, and one of them is often privacy. An agent rifl ing through a Seer’s wardrobe does not want to be disturbed or seen, and would like to know whether the Seer is concurrently sneaking into her apartment. Spies meeting in order to pass on information would rather know if they suddenly need to act naturally. Ensuring Solitude allows them all to be more secure in the knowledge that they will be aware of any intrusion.

Moving Target (Space •• + Time ••; optional Prime ••)
In addition to being able to locate a person or object to whom the caster has a sympathetic connection, this spell also allows the caster to trace the movements of the target of this
spell. This spell allows the caster to track the past movements of the target (with Time 3, he can also predict where the target may go next). If the caster includes Prime in the spell, the spell
also indicates when and where the person or object used or was associated with magic (but not what kind).
Practice: Knowing
Action: Instant and contested; targets rolls Composure + Gnosis reflexively.
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 1 Mana (for the sympathetic casting)
When performing this spell as an extended action, the caster usually sets out a map and draws on it. When this spell is performed as an instant spell, the caster can either look at or visualize a map and the target’s movements will appear on it. In all cases, the target’s current location lies at the end of this path. This spell does not allow the caster to see what the target is doing. For that, the caster needs to cast Space 2 “Scrying,” to open a scrying window. This spell merely allows him to track the target’s location and movements, and, if Prime is used, to know just where he uses or encounters magic.
Guardians of the Veil Rote: Mapping the Fugitive
Dice Pool: Perception + Investigation + Time versus Composure + Gnosis
In the careful and paranoid ranks of the Guardians of the Veil, this rote is used quite often. In addition to tracking the movements and location of important and powerful Artifacts, this rote is also used to spy upon the movements of mages that the caster worries might be using too much vulgar magic or otherwise disrupting the Sleepers or revealing magic to the Fallen World. This rote is also regularly used to keep track of the movements of suspected members of the Seers of the Throne. In addition to tracking enemies and disruptive mages, members of the Guardians of the Veil also regularly use this rote to keep track of one another. Most Guardians have no greater fear than one of their number either betraying them to the Seers or the Banishers, so they regularly watch anyone who begins to act suspiciously. All but the most naïve Guardians are perfectly aware of this sort of spying, which further reduces the odds of a member helping the order’s enemies.

Expanded Volume (Space •••)
The mage adds to the internal volume of any existing container or enclosed space of Size 3 or less, without expanding the space’s external dimensions. Thus a jar, shoe box or jacket
pocket could hold two, three or more times than what could normally fit into a container of that size. The interior behaves exactly as if the container had become deeper, which means
someone reaching in might not be able to touch the bottom and fragile objects might break if allowed to drop into the container. Objects must be inserted and retrieved by hand, and
must be small enough to fi t through the container’s opening. The item is capable of holding the full weight of whatever fits inside without breaking, but will become appropriately heavy
as it’s filled.
Practice: Weaving
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Vulgar
Cost: None
Each success adds an amount equal to the containers’ original volume to the total, so one success doubles its volume, two successes triples it, etc. When the spell expires, any contents
of the container in excess of the original volume are expelled to the outside of the container, starting with what was at the “bottom.” Anyone standing near the container may be subject
to Knockdown (see “Knockdown,” p. 168 in the World of Darkness Rulebook).
Guardians of the Veil Rote: Deep Pockets
Dice Pool: Dexterity + Subterfuge + Space
A Guardian tends to use this rote under two conditions. First, when he needs to carry extra equipment without calling attention to himself, and second, when he needs to smuggle
something away without causing suspicion. Experienced users of the spell are careful to match the added volume of the container to their purposes, so they can retrieve the contents quickly without having to grope for what they need.

Tempus Fugit (Time •)
Time is relative: it crawls when you’re stuck in traffic, it speeds by when you’re visiting a lover. With this spell, the mage can influence a target’s subjective experience of time.
Practice: Compelling
Action: Instant; subtract target’s Composure.
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: None
For each success, the mage may add or subtract up to five minutes to the target’s internal time clock. The target will feel with absolute certainty that the correct time is that much later or earlier, and act accordingly. So strong is this altered sense of time that the spell’s recipient won’t feel any need to check with a watch or clock for the duration of the spell. When the spell expires, the target’s sense of time resumes its normal accuracy, but he won’t sense that he’s gained or lost time until he sees a clock or some other clue to the real time. (Should the target happen to see the correct time while the spell is in effect, he’s free to act on that knowledge even though it
contradicts his instincts.) If the target is a mage with Time 1 or greater, he makes a reflexive Wits + Composure roll to sense that he’s a victim of Time magic.
Guardians of the Veil Rote: Personal Time
Dice Pool: Intelligence + Subterfuge + Time – Composure
As with many Guardian rotes, strategic application is key to getting the best results from this spell. Knowing the target’s schedule — he needs to be at such-and-such a place at such-andsuch a time — allows the mage to disrupt or manipulate him more effectively (someone taking a leisurely day off may not change his behavior much no matter what time he thinks it is, while someone on his lunch hour may bolt if he thinks his time is up). The rote can still be useful in the absence of such knowledge; causing a subject of surveillance to linger in one place long enough to be carefully observed, for example.

Library of Time (Time ••)
While the Guardians are known for their patience and deliberation, they also appreciate the need for speed. At times when they must pore over tomes of lore as quickly as possible, the use of the Time Arcanum allows them to research in minutes what others would take hours to do.
Practice: Ruling
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: None
Each success allows the caster to make one Research roll per 15 minutes for extended action research (see “Research,” pp. 55–56, the World of Darkness Rulebook), instead of the usual 30 minutes per roll.
Guardians of the Veil Rote: The Right Book
Dice Pool: Wits + Academics + Time
An Eleventh Question mage (see p. 166-168) devised this rote after being forced to go through a suspect’s rare book collection, looking for a specific clue about a breed of octopus
used for a sympathetic connection to an acamoth. Because he was unable to find the information in time, the acamoth caused the deaths of three mages before its destruction. The
Question vowed he would fi nd a way to search for information more quickly and so developed this rote.

Heroic Effort (Fate ••)
Sometimes, a person just has to give a desperate situation her all. Usually, it’s not enough to make a difference, but sometimes — just sometimes — she manages to pull off the one-in-a-million stunt that saves the day. Of course, those with the power to manipulate
the odds are often a little less hesitant about jumping into such “hopeless situations.”
Practice: Ruling
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: None
After successfully casting this spell, the mage treats the next chance roll she is called upon to make (see the World of Darkness Rulebook, p. 125) during the spell’s Duration as having a die pool of one. This means that the willworker can succeed on a roll of eight through 10 (and benefit from such advantages as 8- or 9-again) and cannot dramatically fail the roll in question. Upon
so modifying such a chance roll, the spell automatically expires, and the mage may not choose whether or not to apply the spell’s effects to a given chance roll.
Adamantine Arrow Rote: Better Lucky Than Good
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Fate
John O’Dale, an Acanthus Arrow of some small fame among the Consilii scattered across the English countryside, was, among other things, an inveterate gambler. He loved to take all manner of ridiculous wagers to perform insanely improbable deeds — preferably for considerable sums of money. While many of those who bet against him knew that he used magic to transform abject impossibilities into fighting chances, he was always entertaining
enough about it and such a good sport on the frequent occasions upon which he still managed to fall short that no one complained much about it.

Fortune’s Fool (Fate ••••)
It is said that fortune favors the bold. Unfortunately for the bold, accidents still happen. With this spell, the mage learns to store misfortune and inflict it upon others, turning accident into opportunity.
Practice: Patterning
Action: Instant and contested; target rolls Resolve
+ Gnosis reflexively
Duration: Transitory (one turn)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 1 Mana
During a chapter, whenever the mage fails a roll, the mage may reflexively store that failure for later use. The mage may store a total number of failures equal to her Resolve, but only “natural” failures may be stored. Players may not choose to fail a roll in order to store it. The mage releases a failure by selecting a target and casting the spell. With a single success on
the casting roll, the next action taken by that target fails automatically. Once a stored failure is spent, that failure is subtracted from the total. At the end of the chapter, any unused failures are lost.
Adamantine Arrow Rote: Sorrows Shared
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Fate
A good warrior finds a way to turn misfortune to his favor. The Adamantine Arrow developed this
rote to transform missed opportunities into weapons to loose on their foes. Proper use of this rote requires some foresight. It does no good to inflict failure on an enemy just to see that failure manifest itself in a minor way.

Repel (Space ••• + conjunctional Arcanum)
Similar to the “Ban” spell (see p. 237 of Mage: The Awakening) except the mage creates a small area that moves with the caster in which the specified phenomenon may not enter.
Practice: Weaving
Action: Instant
Duration: Concentration
Aspect: Vulgar
Cost: None
The mage combines this spell with an Arcanum of appropriate level to control the phenomenon she wishes to ban (for example, Matter 2 for vapors and liquids, or Forces 3 for electricity). As long as the mage concentrates on the spell, the target of the “Repel” rote may not enter a one-yard radius “bubble” around the caster. This rote was designed to provide temporary
relief from a simple phenomenon (such as falling rock, fire or hail). Choosing a more complex phenomenon (cars, bears, your creepy Uncle Jimmy) can impose up to a –3 penalty to the casting roll depending on specificity of the target phenomenon. Uncle Jimmy is pretty specific and would result in a –1 penalty, while choosing cars is a broader category resulting in a –3
penalty. Repel will protect you from only one type of phenomenon at a time.
Adamantine Arrow Rote: Mantlet
Dice Pool: Resolve + Occult + Space
Members of the Adamantine Arrow frequently use this spell as a means of safely advancing while under fire from mundane ranged weaponry. Bullets, arrows and rocks are easily deflected
by this spell as the warrior advances.

Duplicate (Time •••••)
The mage prepares Time to repeat itself, allowing him to duplicate the results of a single action as if he had performed that action exactly the same way two times.
Practice: Making
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 1 Mana during casting; 1 Mana on activation
The mage casts the spell on himself, storing it for later use (this storage counts against the mage’s Spell Tolerance). Casting the spell requires the expenditure of one Mana and a single success on the casting roll. This spell may have its Duration increased to one day by spending an additional Mana during the casting. Only one instance of Duplicate may exist on a mage
at any time. Activating the stored spell is a reflexive action that costs one Mana. Once the spell is active, the next instant action performed by the mage will be doubled as though the mage had performed the action twice. Any expenditure required by the repeated action must be paid for twice, and any penalties accrued by that action will be inflicted twice.
Example: An Adamantine Arrow decides to attack his enemy with the “Telekinetic Strike” rote (see Mage: The Awakening, p. 170) and double the effectiveness of the spell by activating Duplicate. The Arrow gains four successes on his casting roll for Telekinetic Strike and succeeds at the aiming check to hit his target. In the span of one turn, the Arrow’s target receives eight levels of bashing damage from the duplicated “Telekinetic Strike” spell. If the Arrow had decided to change the damage to lethal, he would have been required to spend three Mana
this turn (one for each casting of Telekinetic Strike and one Mana for activating Duplicate). The total number of Paradox dice rolled for the doubled casting of Telekinetic Strike would be a minimum of three (Gnosis 3 required to spend three Mana a turn generates a base pool of two
dice, plus an additional die from the successive casting of a vulgar spell in the same scene).
Adamantine Arrow Rote: Multiplicity
Dice Pool: Resolve + Occult + Time
The origins of this rote are dubious at best. Legend states this rote was developed by a warrior-mage Exarch shortly before his ascension to the Realms Supernal via the Celestial Ladder. Regardless of the rote’s origin, the obvious advantages of this spell led to its further
development by the Adamantine Arrow. The ability to increase damage done versus time spent is of interest to any warrior.

Forbidden Fate (Fate ••••)
The willworker alters someone’s destiny so the person has great difficulty accomplishing a single specific goal. Attempts by the target to accomplish this goal are fraught with ill fortune and literally everything that can go wrong does. Microphones screech or go dead at particularly inopportune times, the target stumbles while running, and fragile objects the target uses are
far more inclined to fall and break.
Practice: Ruling
Action: Instant
Duration: Prolonged (one scene)
Aspect: Covert
Cost: 1 Mana
The character must declare a specific goal the target cannot reach. This goal must be a deliberate choice on the target’s part and not something necessary for survival, such as breathing or eating. This spell can ban “getting to work on time Monday morning,” but not “ever getting to work on time” or even “getting to work on time each Monday.” Examples of valid goals include attacking or defeating a particular enemy, attempting to steal or otherwise acquire a particular object, applying for a specific job, giving a particular speech or presentation,
running for an elected office, creating a work of art, and any similar actions. For the duration of
this spell, any actions the target takes to directly accomplish the forbidden goal suffer a dice penalty equal to the number of dots in the Fate Arcanum the caster possesses.
Silver Ladder Rote: The Hobbling of Enemies
Dice Pool: Manipulation + Subterfuge + Fate
One of the best ways to win an election or convince others to accept your ideas is to make
certain anyone opposing you looks sufficiently bad that you and your ideas look better in comparison. This rote ensures those who oppose members of the Silver Ladder often fail quite badly in their efforts, because this spell can easily make an expert seem a rank amateur.

Bio:

Cerebrus began his journey as a former barbarian in Hyperborea. What does the future hold?

Grimoire of Cerebrus

Mage: a Journey of the Ages Texan